Wants

As with needs our wants also hold a very personal measure of value. A large part of our modern lives are preoccupied with the ‘wanting of things’. This is largely due to extensive marketing campaigns from the advertising industry. They profit from our unending quest for happiness and social acceptance. They elude us into believing that we are somewhat inadequate if we do not engage in purchasing their products. In Roald Dahl’s 1971 film adaptation of his best-selling book, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, character Veruca Salt famously exclaims, ‘I want one. I want a golden goose!’ This precocious statement of ‘want’ shows the lust of instant gratification. In this moment of desire, there is minimal thought for the long-term impact such a purchase may have on the owner, or in this case on the goose!

Having or wanting is a concept of ownership. This abyss of wanting more is a shallow satisfaction that has us caught up in a cycle of replacement and acquisition. In our everyday lives, we have access to purchase many objects from a variety of sources. Anything you could possibly ever want is available from shopping complexes and websites. When Rightsizing, the question of ‘what do we want?’ will repeatedly be brought to the surface. ‘What we want’ will impact on the amount of objects that we decide to keep in our homes. ‘What we want’ will aid and hinder our projects as we begin to identify our needs in relation to how much space we have leftover to keep our wants. Before you buy something, to find out if it is a ‘need’ or simply a ‘want’, see how you feel about it before you make your purchase. If it’s from a store hold it in your hands and contemplate what value this will add and for how long; will it continue to do so? Alternatively, if it is an online purchase really think about this object before you frivolously click ‘add to cart’. Focus deeply on this object to see if it’s not just a token to symbolise something that may be missing from you emotionally or if it is just simply the vanity of owning the object in question.

The psychological ramifications of always wanting to own more things is addictive and leaves us increasingly empty as this compulsive dependency of ‘wanting’ takes over. As we saw in Chapter 1, having more belongings does not lead to an increased level of happiness. Looking for this fulfilment outside of ourselves will leave us with a lot of objects to maintain, look for and be responsible for in the long run. When we are in the PAUSE stage contemplating our wants it is important, to be honest with yourself about your self-worth in relation to the things you own. Begin to address your own feelings on how your possessions make you feel. Just because you own something are you more likely to feel either superior and important or inferior in the presence of others? Do you feel resentful or less worthy because you do not own something that someone else has? By investigating our relationship with our wants it will be easier to discard the excess in our lives.

LifeByDesign

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Balance in the Modern World

Today our modern lives are a series of choices and decisions. This allows us a certain freedom to shape our lives that our grandparents and great-grandparents were not given. Today we live by modern mantras such as ‘Life by design’, ‘You can be anything’, ‘Do what you want to do’ and ‘You can have it all’. We all have access to the benefits of modern life from various technologies such as computers, fast food, social media and mobile phones. Our lives are now shaped and enriched by a tapestry of globalisation. We are able to complete our responsibilities at home and work faster than ever before. Nevertheless, the fast pace of our modern lives tends to leave us ‘time-poor’ to consider our range of choices. Time-poor is when we lack free or spare time and/or are under pressure to complete tasks quickly. This may lead us to be impulsive when deciding what will add value and what may disrupt our balance.

What we buy and what we bring into our homes is always in a constant state of flux. As individuals,we are also growing and changing as much as the procession of our belongings. As our interests change so do the items we need, and we want change to reflect this. Rightsizing summarises balance as a situation in which different elements are equal or in the correct proportions. Bringing balance to our everyday lives is an ongoing process. Work-life balance is the division of how one’s time and attention is split between working, family and leisure commitments. This modern term clarifies how all our elements of work, home and health fit and work effortlessly together. When this flows harmoniously it is an uplifting time that allows us feelings of connectedness, high motivation and increased life satisfaction. However, when this synchronicity is interrupted and our lives become out of step we feel overwhelmed, chaotic and exhausted.

When this happens the first thing to do is to ‘press the pause button’ so we can reevaluate both our obligations and commitments to assist in the bringing back of harmony to our world. Living in a balanced way is self-perpetuating. One positive action in a certain area will spill over into all our life segments. Learning the art of saying NO will help to bring what is really important to the forefront. Some examples of realigning our balance might be saying ‘NO’ to junk food by choosing healthier food options, reducing social outings and even limiting our Netflix bingeing on weeknights in favour of a few extra hours of sleep! Balance is a skill that takes time to cultivate and achieve. Balance and organisation work together to allow us to be clear about how we interact and interpret the space around us. Using The Rightsize Approach will encourage and establish systems to enable you to balance the clutter in your life.

RightsizeYourLife

**2020 Special Book Pricing** Click here to order your copy for $20.00 plus $5.00 for shipping anywhere in Australia http://bit.ly/2020RightsizeYourLife

Reclaim Your Space

Find Your Why

Finding your WHY is important for you to hook your motivation and ignite your intention to start your Rightsizing journey. ‘All knowledge meets an end at the question … Why?’, said American author and philosopher Criss Jami. If we know WHY we are doing something this will allow us to fully emerge ourselves in all we do. Drilling down through our WHYs will give us a clear, defined, specific outcome, which allows you to discover what your emotional outcome is. If we know what is in our hearts of hearts, or what our true emotional needs are, we will be able to provide ourselves with a new template to live our lives through. We will achieve our vision to live better with our belongings by identifying the emotional benefits we will experience from changing our physical space. Knowing your WHY is HOW we are successful but also it assists us in WHAT we maintain as lasting successful outcomes.

 

If we think back to our kitchen example, the why behind this could pathway like this:

Why am I starting in my kitchen? > I am choosing to start in my kitchen because I am frustrated as it is so untidy. Why is this frustrating? > Because I am unable to find items instantly. Why is it frustrating when you cannot find things? > Because I need to rebuy items I cannot locate. Why is this a problem? > It costs me extra money. Why would rightsizing solve this for you? > It will allow me to see all my utensils and I could avoid spending extra dollars on repurchasing. Why will this be beneficial to you? > Because I will have more time and money. Why is this important? > Because I will now be able spend both in other areas of my life. Why will this be valuable to you? > Because I will be happier as my quality of life will have improved.

 

This shows how asking ourselves WHY until we have reached our emotional outcome will allow us to verbalise our specific of our own WHY for our project.

 

 

Life By Design

Space

Our home is where we take shelter, make our memories and how we communicate desirable versions of ourselves to others through our belongings. ‘Your home is your living space not your storage space’ says Francine Jay, author of the book titled The Joy of Less. This, I could not agree with more! Stowing things that impact on our space for living in is counterintuitive for healthy living, as we now know that existing in an overly cluttered environment is an unhealthy place for us to inhabit. It impacts negatively on our concentration, productivity and adds extra anxieties to our lives. When Rightsizing SPACE is considered an area that is unoccupied, empty and/or free. When we begin discarding objects from our lives, this opens up space for us to enjoy what really matters. The act of creating more space in your home will require action-based dividing and sorting of the belongings no longer required.

 

Space feels good when you start to make it in your home. I can become a key motivator in the Rightsize process. One project I recently worked on was with an intergenerational family all living under the same roof. The Rightsize project we had decided on together was to clear the clutter from the guest bedroom to  make space for a new baby arriving a few months later. Bill, the patriarch of this family, passed comment to me about his thoughts on space. He said, ‘When we were living with so much around us it felt our lives were full. A life lived because we had so much to show for it. But now with more pockets of space throughout the house, I still feel full but also free. None of us were expecting that.’ 

 

This perfectly illustrates how they were all unaware of how living in both a crowded and cluttered environment had impacted on himself and the family. As Bill has described there was this sense of feeling lighter because of the openness created by discarding their excess. This is a great motivation igniter, as space is addictive. When someone has lived in a cluttered home for a long time the effects they encounter during the removal process is very powerful. Pausing to reflect on how you feel about your home emotionally is a proactive task to do, before the planning phase. It allows you to gain a perspective on how you live currently with the things you own.

 

Revising your floor plan will be useful to see if shifting your furniture around may be beneficial in creating more space, using the measurements of your floor plan as a guide to what can moved around to suit your space better. Think about what you will ‘keep’ and how these items could add to the aesthetics of your space by creating ‘interior stories’. These stories will function as decorative statements to show who you are, what you like and even where you have been. Make these revamped changes by hanging objects, showcasing shelf stories and envision a feature point or focal piece for your rooms. Gather all your like objects together to allow them to be the focus or theme of the room, such as geometric patterns for the guest room, a nautical theme for the entrance and one-block colour for your office. Thinking about creative ways to hang photographs on the wall together as a feature, whereby leaving flat areas clear. Cluster items that are precious in odd numbers such as  groups of  three and five. Arrange a carefully curated collection of items in height order for a streamlined look. Storing items out of sight, yet making them easily accessible when you need them, is a way of reducing the excess stimuli in our space so our homes can become our happy place! The way you style your belongings around your space will evoke your memories, allow you to feel connected to your world through your ‘keep’ items and show off your creative side!

 

Elements for design are:

Colour ,tone, texture, line, direction, shape, size, proportion

 

Principles for design are:

Balance , rhythm, unity,  repetition, harmony, contrast, dominance