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Essential Objects: A Critical Item That Is a Needed Necessity For Daily Living

An ESSENTIAL item is one that is absolutely necessary and considered extremely important to our daily lives. Essential items contribute to our reality by bringing comfort and practicality. They can range from our basic needs such as clothing to gadgets that assist us with daily living tasks. These vital objects will most definitely be objects to be kept in our homes. However, this is the category where we may find ourselves with an excess amount of essentials, particularly in our kitchen and linen cupboards. When we PICK our ESSENTIAL objects pay close attention to what is really needed. Filter your choices by asking yourself the Rightsize Questions to assist you in this process. To Keep or Not To Keep client Monica had this to say about ESSENTIAL items: ‘I thought this would be easy as everything was essential! Seriously, I didn’t realise how much extra I had hiding in my dining room cupboards. I really only needed one six-piece dinner set and one special set for when the extended family come for Christmas Dinner. The rest I donated to my local charity store.’

Learn more by clicking this link  http://bit.ly/2020RightsizeYourLife to purchase your copy of Rightsize Your Life!: The Balanced Approach to Living Better with Your Belongings

Featured

An Introduction to Object Classification

In The Rightsize Approach PICK is the fourth stage of The 6Ps and it is where we begin the process of Object Classification. This is the HOW part of the Rightsize Ratio. PICK is when we choose an object and categorise it according to how we feel about it and/or how and when we use it. PICK uncovers our true reasoning behind why we are living with a particular object. Object Classification is the category we assign an item from a list of ten headings. When we have an understanding of what an object means to us and we know its classification we can make choices relating to ‘keeping or not keeping’ this object in our lives.

The ten Object Classifications are the following headings: Essential, Luxury, Significant, Given, Sentimental, Heirloom, Recreational, Seasonal, Legacy and Maybe. If we know what something means to us we are better able to understand why we need to keep it. It gives us a representation of what are the most valuable things we own. The Rightsizing Rule for this process is if an object is placed into two or more classifications it will be immediately become a ‘keep item’. You will appreciate this classification process when we come to our Rightsizing solutions in Chapter 11. We will be able to use the classification headings as a way to embrace our project strategies.

Learn more by clicking this link  http://bit.ly/2020RightsizeYourLife to purchase your copy of Rightsize Your Life!: The Balanced Approach to Living Better with Your Belongings

Object Classification

Object Classification is the category we assign an item from a list of ten headings. When we have an understanding of what an object means to us and we know its classification we can make choices relating to ‘keeping or not keeping’ this object in our lives.

The ten Object Classifications are the following headings: Essential, Luxury, Significant, Given, Sentimental, Heirloom, Recreational, Seasonal, Legacy and Maybe. If we know what something means to us we are better able to understand why we need to keep it. It gives us a representation of what are the most valuable things we own. The Rightsizing Rule for this process is if an object is placed into two or more classifications it will be immediately become a ‘keep item’. You will appreciate this classification process when we come to our Rightsizing solutions in Chapter 11. We will be able to use the classification headings as a way to embrace our project strategies.

YouAreYourMemories

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You Are Your Memories

Memories

Arthur M. Schlesinger said, ‘Science and technology revolutionise our lives, but memory, tradition and myth frame our response.’ Our memories are stored in our minds and we are able to take them with us everywhere we go. They are a part of our identity and often account for a large part of who we are. Different types of our memories are stored in different parts of our brains. We have memories that are about events that have taken place in our lives and these are known as ‘episodic memories’. We also have ‘semantic’ memories that include facts and broad-spectrum information. We also store ‘implicit’ memories that are linked to movement or how our muscles remember how to operate a television remote or how to knit a scarf. We also have long-term and short-term memories; these assist us to navigate the past and present respectively. Once we have affixed a tangible physical artefact to a memory this object becomes a symbolic reminder of the memory we have attached to it. This object ‘becomes’ the memory. The feelings associated with it are what we need to identify before we are ready to let go of this item from our lives.

 

When we know WHY we feel a certain way about an object we will be able to assign it an Object Classification. This classification will be critical in understanding our own relationship to this object. If this is an object we identify ourselves with, we must give it space to live with us. Or we might well be ready to positively let go of this object but still retain the memory that we associate to it. By choosing to let it go we will create a new memory of this object in our minds. For example, when letting go of some of your good quality ‘work’ clothes, visualise the value the new owner may receive from your donation, such as obtaining employment because your no-longer-needed jacket allowed them to look the part for the job. Another example I like to use with my clients is donating good-quality items that have packaging such as crystal vases, candlesticks and sliver photo frames as they may be of great value to someone who needs to purchase a high-end item without the retail price tag. Our tangible objects serve us as physical reminders of these memories that we have attached to them. Ultimately, YOU are your memories.