Planning

Planning is an important component when beginning any project. Creating specific, clearly defined goals will guarantee that you will heighten your momentum, motivation and focus. By visualising your best outcome, you will be able to physically recreate this goal in your home. Be ‘action’ focused and proud of the commitment you have made to address the clutter in your life. When we PLAN for obstacles that may cause distraction we will be able to anticipate and prevent these from extinguishing our attentiveness. Rightsizing is outcome-focused. Most of all believe you CAN and success will follow. Henry Ford said this about self-belief: ‘Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re right’. When Rightsizing, projecting this self- belief means you are already halfway there to reclaiming your space!

BespokeBlueprints

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Wants

As with needs our wants also hold a very personal measure of value. A large part of our modern lives are preoccupied with the ‘wanting of things’. This is largely due to extensive marketing campaigns from the advertising industry. They profit from our unending quest for happiness and social acceptance. They elude us into believing that we are somewhat inadequate if we do not engage in purchasing their products. In Roald Dahl’s 1971 film adaptation of his best-selling book, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, character Veruca Salt famously exclaims, ‘I want one. I want a golden goose!’ This precocious statement of ‘want’ shows the lust of instant gratification. In this moment of desire, there is minimal thought for the long-term impact such a purchase may have on the owner, or in this case on the goose!

Having or wanting is a concept of ownership. This abyss of wanting more is a shallow satisfaction that has us caught up in a cycle of replacement and acquisition. In our everyday lives, we have access to purchase many objects from a variety of sources. Anything you could possibly ever want is available from shopping complexes and websites. When Rightsizing, the question of ‘what do we want?’ will repeatedly be brought to the surface. ‘What we want’ will impact on the amount of objects that we decide to keep in our homes. ‘What we want’ will aid and hinder our projects as we begin to identify our needs in relation to how much space we have leftover to keep our wants. Before you buy something, to find out if it is a ‘need’ or simply a ‘want’, see how you feel about it before you make your purchase. If it’s from a store hold it in your hands and contemplate what value this will add and for how long; will it continue to do so? Alternatively, if it is an online purchase really think about this object before you frivolously click ‘add to cart’. Focus deeply on this object to see if it’s not just a token to symbolise something that may be missing from you emotionally or if it is just simply the vanity of owning the object in question.

The psychological ramifications of always wanting to own more things is addictive and leaves us increasingly empty as this compulsive dependency of ‘wanting’ takes over. As we saw in Chapter 1, having more belongings does not lead to an increased level of happiness. Looking for this fulfilment outside of ourselves will leave us with a lot of objects to maintain, look for and be responsible for in the long run. When we are in the PAUSE stage contemplating our wants it is important, to be honest with yourself about your self-worth in relation to the things you own. Begin to address your own feelings on how your possessions make you feel. Just because you own something are you more likely to feel either superior and important or inferior in the presence of others? Do you feel resentful or less worthy because you do not own something that someone else has? By investigating our relationship with our wants it will be easier to discard the excess in our lives.

LifeByDesign

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Motivation

The Rightsizing concept is based on the psychology of motivation using cognitive perspectives. Cognitive theories give us an alternative methodology to motivation through expectancy-value theory, goal-setting theories and self-determination theory. Expectancy value theory reveals that outcomes are determined by how much someone believes they can accomplish something. Following this theory to achieve our goal we must first believe that it is possible. Goal-setting theories offer a cognitive tactic to establish outcomes through social learning, learning through modelling our behaviour patterns from the observation of others. Self-determination theory is a modern suggestion that people have three inherent needs of competence, independence and connection to others. Once these needs are met rather than compromised, one’s intrinsic motivation will be activated. Intrinsic motivation is our natural ability to be driven to undertake something for the satisfaction of the activity.

Peter J. Daniels says in his 1987 book How to be motivated all the time, ‘The best antidote to discouragement is motivation. A person who is both personally and permanently motivated doesn’t give up easily!Rightsizing your belongings requires a high level of commitment and ownership of positive outcomes before, during and after your projects. It is a skill that requires you to act upon your own motivational capabilities. Self-determination will allow you to improve your lifestyle by reducing the items you own by creating clearly thought-out goals. That will empower your overall pledge to the Rightsizing process, thus establishing a high level of motivation to your decided-upon goals and projects. Applying a growth mindset will mean you can spend your energies finding ways to solve problems rather than fixating on the difficulties. Looking toward the future with the knowledge of our past motivates us from within when following a well-thought-out action plan. When we physically act motivated our minds and hearts will follow suit.

DivideAndConquer

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Balance in the Modern World

Today our modern lives are a series of choices and decisions. This allows us a certain freedom to shape our lives that our grandparents and great-grandparents were not given. Today we live by modern mantras such as ‘Life by design’, ‘You can be anything’, ‘Do what you want to do’ and ‘You can have it all’. We all have access to the benefits of modern life from various technologies such as computers, fast food, social media and mobile phones. Our lives are now shaped and enriched by a tapestry of globalisation. We are able to complete our responsibilities at home and work faster than ever before. Nevertheless, the fast pace of our modern lives tends to leave us ‘time-poor’ to consider our range of choices. Time-poor is when we lack free or spare time and/or are under pressure to complete tasks quickly. This may lead us to be impulsive when deciding what will add value and what may disrupt our balance.

What we buy and what we bring into our homes is always in a constant state of flux. As individuals,we are also growing and changing as much as the procession of our belongings. As our interests change so do the items we need, and we want change to reflect this. Rightsizing summarises balance as a situation in which different elements are equal or in the correct proportions. Bringing balance to our everyday lives is an ongoing process. Work-life balance is the division of how one’s time and attention is split between working, family and leisure commitments. This modern term clarifies how all our elements of work, home and health fit and work effortlessly together. When this flows harmoniously it is an uplifting time that allows us feelings of connectedness, high motivation and increased life satisfaction. However, when this synchronicity is interrupted and our lives become out of step we feel overwhelmed, chaotic and exhausted.

When this happens the first thing to do is to ‘press the pause button’ so we can reevaluate both our obligations and commitments to assist in the bringing back of harmony to our world. Living in a balanced way is self-perpetuating. One positive action in a certain area will spill over into all our life segments. Learning the art of saying NO will help to bring what is really important to the forefront. Some examples of realigning our balance might be saying ‘NO’ to junk food by choosing healthier food options, reducing social outings and even limiting our Netflix bingeing on weeknights in favour of a few extra hours of sleep! Balance is a skill that takes time to cultivate and achieve. Balance and organisation work together to allow us to be clear about how we interact and interpret the space around us. Using The Rightsize Approach will encourage and establish systems to enable you to balance the clutter in your life.

RightsizeYourLife

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Shopping

Shopping is our modern sport of choice. Browsing till we find something we must have. Ordering or purchasing in-store has benefits from lifting our mood to the sublime satisfaction of owning that ‘something special’. These objects declare our belonging to an external group or class and fill a void by giving a representation of who we are. The consumption of mass-produced products is a part of who we are culturally in the Western world. Owning things conveys we have the means to buy. Plus shopping feels good because we like it, as it gives us purpose.

Shopping is a favoured pastime and could even be our hobby, giving purpose and destination to our daily lives. We shop for happiness to fill our lives with something we desire and it provides us with a distraction from our emotional wellbeing. We can all relate to feeling sad or lonely and buying ourselves something that will cheer us up. It gives our brain a chemical buzz such as dopamine or endorphins that make us feel good. This contributes to the cycle of spending and produces patterns of buying to fill our lives. ‘Shopping malls are cathedrals of consumption!’ wrote Paolo Magaudda in his article ‘History of Consumer Culture’ (2015). We now have the act of shopping right here in our homes. Online shopping has increased consumer markets and now we can do this 24/7 and have it delivered, all with the click of a button!

To consume or not to consume**2020 Special Book Pricing** Click here to order your copy for $20.00 plus $5.00 for shipping anywhere in Australia http://bit.ly/2020RightsizeYourLife